News Updates

  • Obesity May Limit Overall Function Two Years After Shoulder Replacement Surgery

    Source: ScienceDaily

    Patients with obesity undergo a disproportionately higher number of elective orthopaedic surgeries in the U.S.

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is an excellent procedure for pain relief and functional improvement in patients with shoulder arthritis.

    A total shoulder replacement was able to provide this patient population (normal BMI) with improved shoulder function which resulted in a better physical function.

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  • Painful frozen shoulder generally resolves, but return to mobility takes time

    Source: The Vancouver Sun

    Nearly a decade has passed since Lynne Robson’s first encounter with frozen shoulder. But she remembers in exquisite detail the limitations it imposed and the pain it caused her.

    Pulling on a winter coat was excruciating. Robson could only wear clothing with front closures, because reaching behind her back to hook a bra, for instance, required a range of movement she no longer had.

    Blow-drying her hair – pretty much a requirement for a TV reporter, which Robson was at the time — was impossibility.

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  • Knee osteoarthritis risk unaffected by moderate exercise

    Source: Medical News Today

    A new study suggests that the risk of middle-aged and older adults developing knee arthritis is unaffected by doing up to 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity, the level recommended by the US government.

    Knee arthritis leading cause of disability and joint pain Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage and underlying bone in a joint break down, leading to bony overgrowth, pain, swelling and stiffness.

    The joints most affected are the knees, hips and those of the hands and spine. The condition, for which there is currently no cure, develops gradually, usually in the over-40s.

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  • Shoulder surgery may make sense for young patients: research

    Source: MD India

    According to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, arthroscopic bankart repair surgery is a cost-effective approach for patients suffering their first shoulder dislocation.

    "We based our conclusions on a Markov model, which takes into account how surgery affects the patient’s recovery in relation to the actual costs of medical treatment," commented Ryan P. Donegan, MD, MS, from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH. "For surgery to be cost-effective in this model, expenses must be under $24,457, the probability of re-dislocation must be under 7 percent, and the quality of life rating must not fall below 0.86. Our research showed surgical costs of $11,267, probability of re-dislocation at only 4 percent and quality of life rating of 0.93 – numbers suggesting surgery is a good investment for these patients." 

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  • Need for changes in rotator cuff surgery rehabilitation suggests study

    Source: MD India

    Existing rehabilitation used for people undergoing tendon-bone repairs like rotator cuff repair perhaps partially to blame for the high rates of failed healing post-surgery suggests study by a new Hospital for Special Surgery. Experiments in a rat model of this injury suggest that immobilizing the limb for four to six weeks after surgery, rather than quickly starting physical therapy, improves healing.

    "Before we did this study, we thought that delaying motion for a short period of time, seven to ten days, and then starting physical therapy would be the most beneficial to tendon healing. However, from the data in this study, it appears we should be immobilizing our patients for longer periods of time," said Scott Rodeo, M.D., principal investigator of the study and co-chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

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