News Updates

  • Different options for shoulder replacement

    Source: PalmBeachPost.com

    Question: I am considering having my shoulder replaced. What questions should I be asking my doctor?

    Answer: The decision to replace your shoulder joint is a very serious one. The most important factor in choosing a surgeon is their experience.
    A study that was published out of Duke University in 2004 demonstrated that the risk of a post-operative complication was reduced by more than 50 percent when surgeons performed a high volume of shoulder replacements in a high-volume hospital, compared to surgeons and hospitals performing relatively few of these procedures. This high volume is typical of shoulder fellowship-trained surgeons.

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  • Arthroscopic approach controls posterior shoulder instability

    Source: Medscape News

    Arthroscopic capsulolabral posterior reconstruction offers advantages in posterior shoulder instability, according to researchers.

    More than 90% of athletes treated for the condition in this manner are able to return to sports, Dr. James P. Bradley told Reuters Health by email.

    While glenohumeral instability is relatively common, affecting 2% of the general population, posterior instability is much rarer, affecting 2% to 10% of all unstable shoulders, according to a 2011 paper in Sports Medicine. Posterior glenohumeral instability is mainly seen in athletes.

    In a June 26 online paper in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Dr. Bradley of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and colleagues observe that there are few reports of arthroscopic treatment of unidirectional posterior shoulder instability.

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  • Knee Replacement Often Beneficial for RA: Study

    Source: WebMD

    The common belief that rheumatoid arthritis patients don’t benefit from knee replacement surgery as much as those with the more common osteoarthritis has been challenged by the findings from a pair of studies by New York City scientists.

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  • Knees Buckling Under Pressure

    Source: DailyRx

    Your body weight and your job may be putting considerable pressure on your knees. This pressure could lead to a medical condition called knee osteoarthritis.

    A recent study found that having a higher body mass index (a measure of height and weight) and living a more active lifestyle were both associated with a higher risk of knee osteoarthritis.

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  • Sports Injuries Strike Again

    Source: DailyRx

    Sports are a great way for kids to get exercise and have fun. But sometimes young athletes get hurt.

    Many sports injuries are mild and heal on their own. Others — such as knee ligament tears — may be more serious and require surgery.

    Athletes who have had surgery to repair knee ligament tears are more likely to experience another knee ligament tear than uninjured athletes, according to a recent study.

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